Press and Media Coverage

Wai Yee Hong is an independent, family-run Chinese supermarket based in Bristol for over 30 years. We’re happy to help with interviews and comment on Chinese culture and food, so please feel free to contact us. For more information and images, please see our Press Resources page.

Men’s Health – April 2011

Wai Yee Hong in Men's Health

Wai Yee Hong’s online store is recommended as a place to buy Black Rice, historically reserved for royalty in China!

 

guardian.co.uk – Recommended!

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Wai Yee Hong and our online store get recommended by celebrity chefs, Fuchsia Dunlop and David Thompson in articles in The Observer and guardian.co.uk!

studentcooking.tv – Student Shopping Guide

Wai Yee Hong Chinese Supermarket

Wai Yee Hong features in the Bath International Student Shopping Guide! Student presenter, Sky recommends us as a supplier of international groceries and shows viewers around our store in this fun online video!

 
 

yelp.co.uk 26-May-2010

Aisle in Wai Yee Hong Chinese Supermarket

“A paradise of Chinese shopping, this supermarket contains just about everything oriental you could ever want.” We’re glad to hear that this reviewer on yelp.co.uk likes our wide product range, and look forward to welcoming them in store again soon!

yelp.co.uk 25-May-2010

Wai Yee Hong, Eastgate Oriental city

Another kind customer has written some very kind words about us on yelp.co.uk. Thank-you very much; it means a lot to us!

 

yelp.co.uk 20-May-2010

Wai Yee Hong, Eastgate Oriental City

Thank-you so much to this reviewer on yelp.co.uk for their custom, and taking the time to give us such a nice review. We really appreciate it!

The Telegraph – May 2010

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Wai Yee Hong is recommended as an online Chinese Supermarket, not once, but twice in the Telegraph in May 2010! Assam Prawns and Braised Red Pork Belly are on the menu this month!

 

ITV West – April 2010

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ITV filmed in our shop as part of a report on a local Chinese cancer awareness campaign. It is believed that Chinese people adapting their diet to include more meat and dairy ingredients has led to an increase in numbers being diagnosed with cancer.